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1930's Farmer's Wife: Jenny

 The Jenny block can be found on page 150 of the  1930's Farmer's Wife Sampler  (page 204 for template instructions.)

The Jenny block can be found on page 150 of the 1930's Farmer's Wife Sampler (page 204 for template instructions.)

Click here for the original Farmer's Wife Magazine, the letter written by Am I Right or Wrong? in Wisconsin can be found on page 16.

March 1939

This is an interesting tidbit for conspiracy theorists.  A book entitled The Strange Death of Adolf Hitler was published anonymously in the US, alleging that Adolf Hitler had actually been assassinated by omelette poisoning in late September 1938 before German the annexation of Czechoslovakia.  The world and German people had been bamboozled, and the "Adolf Hitler" leading Germany after the annexation was actually a number of look alike impersonators under the control of Nazi Party leaders.  As a dabbler in conspiracy theories myself, this is a weird one!  But I did find the full text of the book on archive.org so if you're interested. 

Long story short, there's no evidence that Adolf Hitler ever succumbed to an assassination attempt and on March 15, 1939 the German army marched unopposed across the Czech boarder and into Prague to establish political and actual control of the country.  Several days later on March 20, Germany extended an ultimatum to the government of Lithuania demanding capitulation of the Memel territory, the Lithuanian government ceded the territory the next day.  German news organizations also began circulating rumors of Polish oppression of ethnic Germans living in Poland, which stirred up anti-Polish sentiments and support for an impending invasion of Poland.  In response to Hitler's blatant disregard for the Munich Conference, British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain ordered the British Army double in size.

In the United States, a general sense of economic optimism was starting to grow.  The Great Depression was coming to a close, unemployment rates had fallen to 17% from 26% in 1933.  The average household income was $1,730, and nearly 2/3's of American's attended the movies on a weekly basis.  Big Band music was popular: the song "Deep Purple" topped radio pop charts.  Written in 1933 by Peter Derose, but Bea Wain and Larry Clinton's version of the song finally broke through to the public.  

Handsomepants is a huge Big Band fan!  He has quite a collection of original vinyls, all arranged by composer and release date.  He only plays those vinyls on a 1943 Fisher radio/player combination cabinet.  He has play lists on Spotify and Pandora, and very proudly announces the song title and composer within the first 4 bars of music every time a new song starts.  Listening to Big Band has become a bit of a family pass time and it usually helps the kids to do chores around the house.

To help me with the upkeep of the house we have chore sticks. The girls each pick 3 sticks, that have different chores on them, and chores have to be done before dinner. This way a sense of monotony is gone because you never know which chore is going to be selected, they girls have a period of time to show me they can be responsible without me breathing down their necks, and I have less housework to do. But listening to music while cleaning helps the time pass, and we can spend time as a family the entire evening.


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The Block

The Jenny block is easier to piece than you might think, you just have to be conscious of the order by which you piece the block.  

Make four large triangles by piecing 2 A pieces to 1 B piece.  By breaking down block into smaller components, it’s easier to complete.

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Pre-Cuts

A (4) 3 x 3", cut into HST's

B (4) 5 x 2"


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Happy Quilting!

- Rita

1930's Farmer's Wife: Mrs. Morgan

 The Mrs. Morgan block can be found on page 30 of the  1930's Farmer's Wife Sampler  (page 230 for template instructions.)

The Mrs. Morgan block can be found on page 30 of the 1930's Farmer's Wife Sampler (page 230 for template instructions.)

Click here for the original Farmer's Wife Magazine, the letter written by Mother of Four in Kansas can be found on page 12.

March 1931

President Hoover signed a congressional resolution declaring the “Star Spangled Banner” the official national anthem of the United States, although the song had been used in an official capacity since 1889. Prior to March 1931, two other songs were also considered national anthems, “My Country Tis of Thee,” and “America the Beautiful.”

The “Star Spangled Banner” was a poem written on September 4, 1814 following the Battle of Baltimore by Francis Scott Key. Key, after having witnessed the naval assault on Baltimore Harbor as a captive on a British ship, was inspired to write the poem after seeing a large flag with 15 stars and 15 stripes still flying after the end of the battle. This flag was nick named the Star Spangled Banner, and was made by Mary Young Pickersgill, and is on display at the Smithsonian.

There’s something nostalgic about the “Star Spangled Banner” and studying the early wars after American independence. It reminds me of elementary school and reciting the Pledge of Allegiance every morning around the flag pole. IT remind me of watching or marching in the band at the annual Homecoming and Fourth of July Parades. Those are memories I want my children to share.

I can't help but be a bit envious of the community that Mrs. B. F. C. describes in her Letter to the Editor.  I grew up in a small city and have lived in Denver for the last 6 years, and I can honestly say that I long to move back to a small, boring town.  I miss the sense of community that you don't find the big city.  The kind of community that comes together to solve a problem felt by only a few, like Mrs. B. F. C.'s small town did, and by doing so not only solved the problem but benefited the entire community.  I'll admit that I enjoy the opportunities a large city offers, but I miss that feeling of connection outside of my circle of friends.


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The Block

Piecing itself is pretty simple and straight forward, just pay attention to what you’re doing. For some reason my A pieces turned out not to be completely square, they’re more rectangleish. Oh well, at least they’re uniformly misshapen.!

Pre-Cuts

A (4) 2 x 2

B (12) 2 1/4 x 2 1/4"

C (4) 1 1/ x 2 1/2"

D (4) 1 1/2 2 1/2"

E (4) 2 x 2"

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Ms. H's Baby Quilt - Windmill Quilt

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The youth pastor at our church and his wife announced they were expecting so I pulled this cute tummy time quilt out of the closet just in time for the baby shower. It’s so nice to see little Ms. H toddling around on Sunday’s, she’s so cute! I would say that I need another little one for myself, but she’s a little younger than Little Man and a little older than Wince, so I’m right in the thick of it with cute kiddos.

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I thought that the fabric was called Woodlands by Moda, but I’m not sure and I couldn’t find it online. If anyone recognizes it please comment below! The backing is a cute pink calico from my Aunt Grace’s stash that I received after she passed away.

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I wish I had taken more pictures of the quilt while I still had it. Oh well, blogging lesson learned.

Happy Quilting!

  • Rita

Ginger’s Quilts: Jared's Quilt

Handsomepants is from a family of five kids. It’s always a riot when the whole family gets together and inspired me to want a large family of my own. Last year Handsomepant’s younger brother Jared got married to a lovely lady, and they both like to play video games. So when Ginger asked what kind of a quilt pattern they wanted for their wedding quilt the asked for Majora’s Mask from the game Legend of Zelda: Majora’s Mask.

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Unsure of where to find a king sized pattern of Majora’s mask, because let’s be honest it’s probably not a popular quilt pattern, Ginger turned to the internet. What she ended up doing was converting a stained glass pattern onto paper and pieced or appliqued major parts of the quilt.

 The mask from the game.

The mask from the game.

To keep in line with the look of the stained glass, Ginger selected batik fabrics and outlined the mask with black bias tape. Each section of the quilt is quilted with a different patter, and you can see that best on the back of the quilt because Ginger matched the thread to the quilt top. I like way that patterns are highlighted ob the backing, especially in the boarders where Ginger quilted in Triforce and sword patterns.

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I never played the game, but Handsomepants was quite impressed at the details. I appreciate the giant carpenter’s star Ginger put on the backing. I know that the quilt took a long to make, but I think the wait was worth it!

Happy Quilting!

  • Rita

Ms. K's Baby Quilt - Four Patch Quilt

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The very first friends we made Handsomepants and I moved to Denver, was young couple just our age. They lived across the hall in our apartment building and we met them when they knocked on our door and (trustingly) asked us to keep an eye out for a package delivery. They were leaving town for the weekend and the package hadn’t arrived on time. It turned out it was large flat screen TV! We’ve been friends with Krista and Jason ever since.

 I’m starting to realize how often I use four patches in baby quilts!

I’m starting to realize how often I use four patches in baby quilts!

I’ve written before about my pregnancy with M, when Krista was also pregnant with her first child. His quilt is the red and white air plane quilt in my gallery. But when she announced she was pregnant again I was so excited to find out she was having a girl this time. This time around I wanted to make a low key, sweet baby quilt so I selected a charm pack of Windemere by Brenda Riddle Designs for Moda.

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I took a while to decide how I wanted to handle the quilting. I used a large “hand sewn” stitch on my machine to outline all of the background squares with a gold thread, but other than that I was stuck. I didn’t know what I wanted to do, so I packed the quilt away in the closet for a while. Then one day while on Pinterest I came across some really cute embroidery designs, and the rest was history. I transferred the designs onto freezer paper and used the same “hand sewn” stitch on my machine to quilt the designs into the background fabric. The process of quilting the embroidery designs was slow going, but over all I’m pleased with the results and I’ll definitely reuse the technique on future quilts.

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When I finished this quilt I was so excited to gift it that I forgot to take pictures so I had to call Krista and ask her to take them for me, which she did because she’s awesome. I also forgot the dimension of the quilt, sorry to those who were wondering. But it’s a nice tummy time size, and it’s soft enough to snuggle with!

The banking of Ms. K’s quilt was a tight patterned calico that came from my Aunt Grace after she had passed. I’ve slowly developed an appreciation for calico prints over the years and this is one of my favorites. I’m very glad that there was enough left over to go into a scrappy quilt I’m currently planning.

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Unfortunately I don’t get to see this quilt, or it’s new little owner very often anymore. Krista and Jason decided to move their growing family close to family outside of Colorado. I miss my friends but modern technology does make it easy to stay in touch, and if they every miss me they have something to snuggle with, and that’s what quilting is all about.

Happy Quilting!

  • Rita